See Course Descriptions for information on required courses.

Sociology Major
(Liberal Arts)
Sociology Minor
(Liberal Arts)
Sociology Major (Cultural Studies Concentration)
Sociology Major (Secondary Education)
Sociology Minor (Secondary Education)

Broad Field Social Studies Major in Sociology
Sociology Major
(Criminal Justice Concentration)
Criminal Justice Minor




 
0204
Sociology

Faculty
Michael R. Ball, Professor of Sociology
Marshall Johnson, Professor of Sociology
Gary Keveles, Professor of Criminal Justice
Mary Pulford, Senior Lecturer in Anthropology
 

Sociology Major
(Liberal Arts)

Minimum of 33 credits in Sociology, at least 21 of which must be in courses numbered over 300. Students are required to complete the following courses:

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 390 Qualitative Methods
or
POLS 396 Research Design
SOCI 371 The Sociological Tradition
SOCI 498 Senior Thesis
ANTH 112 Introduction to Anthropology

The remaining Sociology credits are elective.

Sociology majors with an overall grade point average of at least 3.4 may exercise an option to graduate with honors by completing an honors thesis (SOCI 498 for honors).
 

Sociology Minor
(Liberal Arts)

A minimum of 22 credits, of which at least 12 credits must be in courses numbered 300 and above.

All students are required to complete:

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 371 The Sociological Tradition

The remaining credits are elective. A maximum of nine elective credits may be taken from among ANTH 112, 216, 217, 310, 315, 390, 490, and 499.
 

Sociology Major
(Cultural Studies Concentration)

At least 56 credits are required in the areas specified below. At least 21 credits must be in courses numbered 300 and over. No minor required.

15 credits in Anthropology including:

ANTH 112 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 315 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 390 Qualitative Methods/Fieldwork

27 credits in Sociology including:

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 273 Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 371 The Sociological Tradition
SOCI 498 Senior Thesis

* Eight credits in non-English language

At least six credits from among the following:

ART 331 Afro-Art
COMM 467 Intercultural Communication
ENGL 304 First Nations Literature
GEOG 100 World Regional Geography
POLS 175 Introduction to World Politics
POLS 351 Politics of Developing Nations
POLS 360 Middle East Politics
 

Sociology Major
(Secondary Education)

A minimum of 33 credits are required. Students are required to complete the following courses:

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
ANTH 112 Introduction to Anthropology
SOCI 273 Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 339 Secondary Methods in Social Science Education
SOCI 390 Qualitative Methods
SOCI 371 The Sociological Tradition
ANTH 315 Cultural Anthropology

The remaining Sociology credits are elective.

Sociology students in secondary education must also satisfy the Wisconsin statutory requirement in cooperative marketing and consumer cooperatives (SOCI 101 fulfills this requirement), in conservation of natural resources, and in human relations. See Teacher Education in the undergraduate section of this catalog for other specific requirements.
 

Sociology Minor
(Secondary Education)

At least 22 credits in Sociology, including the courses listed below. Requirements must also be met for a secondary education major and the Professional Secondary Education Teaching Certification Requirements of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
ANTH 112 Introduction to Anthropology
SOCI 339 Secondary Methods in Social Science Education
SOCI 371 The Sociological Tradition
SOCI 390 Qualitative Methods

The remaining seven Sociology credits are elective.
 

Broad Field Social Studies Major in Sociology

The Broad Field Social Studies program is interdisciplinary and includes course work in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology.

Certification to teach the fusion courses will be granted upon completion of the program below. Fusion courses are defined as those drawn from several of the social studies disciplines and requiring a composite preparation in social studies. Fusion courses include civics, social problems, American problems, area studies, vital issues, etc.

Coursework in Broad Field Social Studies may also be used, where appropriate, to fulfill the university's General Education requirements. Students majoring in Broad Field Social Studies are urged to work in close cooperation with their academic advisors to ensure efficient completion of the program.

The Broad Field Social Studies major may be completed in either of these two ways:

1. A minimum of 54 semester credits to include a secondary education major in History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology and at least the prescribed courses in the remaining social-scientific disciplines that are listed below.

2. A minimum of 54 semester credits to include all of the following:

a. A secondary education minor in History, Political Science or Psychology.

b. The described courses as listed below.

c. Additional elective credits in any one of the other disciplines within the Broad Major except the field of the teaching minor.


Prescribed Courses:

ECON 235 3 credits
BUS 110 3 credits
PSYC 101 3 credits
PLUS three additional credits in Psychology 3 credits
GEOG 100 and 102 6 credits
HIST 151 or 152 and HIST 111 or 392 6 credits
POLS 150 and 330 6 credits
SOCI 101 3 credits
ANTH 112 3 credits

Any of the prescribed courses outside the major or minor and 10 credits in an additional discipline may be used to satisfy the social science General Education requirement for the university.

Independent Learning Experience:

Every student majoring in Broad Area Social Studies in Sociology is expected to complete an Independent Learning Experience. This requirement is satisfied by taking SOCI 490 Selected Topics in Sociology.
 
 

Sociology Major
(Criminal Justice Concentration)

Understanding crime and justice is essential in a democratic society and studying it is challenging. The curriculum consists of coursework in four areas. Students take at least 23 courses from these four areas to achieve baccalaureate competency in the study of criminal justice. First, completion of 10 core courses in criminal justice permits students to become firmly grounded in a range of basic perspectives in the justice field. Secondly, selection of three traditional courses from the field of Sociology develops an appreciation of a significant way of "knowing" criminal justice. Sociology systematically studies societal institutions and social behavior. Thirdly, completion of four basic courses from psychology, political science, philosophy and math widens and deepens an awareness of the context within which to understand criminal justice. Fourthly, selection of six courses from an elective list of 26 enables students to pursue flexible paths of study tailored to their individual interests in such careers as law enforcement, law and court processing, juvenile and adult corrections as well as graduate education. These elective courses are from the disciplines of political science, psychology, social work, Spanish as well as criminal justice. Four of the 23 courses that students take from the criminal justice curriculum count toward General Education requirements.

Because the Criminal Justice Concentration is considered a comprehensive major, no minor is needed.

A minimum of 72 credits, of which 13 satisfy General Education credits. Excluding these 13 General Educational requirements, the course of study in criminal justice consists of a minimum of 59 credits.

Criminal Justice Required Courses

CJUS 106 Human Behavior and Its Control
CJUS 207 Police in American Communities
CJUS 211 Criminal Law
CJUS 308 Criminology
CJUS 312 Gender, Crime and Justice
CJUS 315 Courts and American Justice
CJUS 316 Crime, Corrections and Punishment
CJUS 396 Research Design
CJUS 463 The Juvenile Justice System
CJUS 491 Criminal Justice Internship (5 credits)1

Sociology Required Courses

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 273 Race and Ethnicity

One other elective three credit course2 in Sociology from the following:

SOCI 303 Sociology of Community
SOCI 369 Sociology of Work
SOCI 390 Qualitative Methods
SOCI 460 Social Class
SOCI 462 Public Opinion and Propaganda
SOCI 464 Social Change
SOCI 466 Social Psychology
SOCI 490 Selected Topics in Sociology3

Required Courses from Other Disciplines

Either MATH 130 Elementary Statistics4 or PSYC 301 Statistics for Psychological Research
POLS 330 U.S. State and Local Government
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
PHIL 211 Contemporary Moral Problems

Elective Courses:

An additional 18 elective credits (or six three-credit courses) taken from among the following 26 optional courses

CJUS 160 Field Experience in Criminal Justice
CJUS 210 Criminal Procedure and Evidence
CJUS 212 Managing Criminal Investigations
CJUS 300 Police Administration
CJUS 317 Interpersonal, Community and Global Violence
CJUS 318 Community Corrections
CJUS 320 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
CJUS 321 Judicial Process and Politics
CJUS 350 An Introduction to Addiction and Recovery
CJUS 368 Alternative Dispute Resolution
CJUS 431 International Law: Human Rights and War Crimes
CJUS 451 Constitutional Law, Part II
CJUS 497 Special and Student-Initiated Seminar
CJUS 499 Individualized Research or Applied Skills1
POLS 150 American National Government
POLS 354 Introduction to Jurisprudence
POLS 370 Public Policy Analysis
POLS 467 Public Administration
POLS 468 Policy Evaluation
PSYC 310 Social Psychology
SOW 227 Interpersonal Skills
SOW 329 Crisis Intervention
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I
SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

Recommended Courses: Although not required, the following five courses are useful electives for those planning careers in justice fields. Students are encouraged to take one or more of these courses as their schedules allow. These credits, as appropriate, also may be applied to the General Education and non-Western requirements.

ANTH 112 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 315 Cultural Anthropology
HIST 161 African People and Issues ? Satisfies the humanities elective (non-Western) requirement.
HIST 225 Latin America Since Independence ? Satisfies the General Education history (non-Western) requirement.
HIST 281 The Muslim World ? Satisfies the General Education history (non-Western) requirement.

Core General Education Requirements

General Education courses within the Criminal Justice curriculum: Eight courses in the criminal justice curriculum are also courses listed under four general educational headings. Six of these eight courses are required criminal justice courses. Two are optional courses:*

MATH 130
Human Behavior: CJUS 106; SOCI 101; PSYC 101
Contemporary Society: SOCI 273; POLS 150*
Humanities Elective: PHIL 211, SPAN 101*

Elective Coursework and Career Tracks

Choosing six among the 26 optional courses may be challenging. These courses offer the opportunity to become familiar with a broad array of concepts, perspectives and methodologies. With a strong liberal arts emphasis, the Criminal Justice Program encourages intellectual curiosity, critical thinking and extensive communication skills, enabling students to live rich and fulfilling professional and personal lives. At the same time, a primary goal of the UW-Superior's Criminal Justice Program is the educational preparation of individuals planning criminal justice careers and the educational advancement of practitioners already enjoying criminal justice careers.

Graduates from UW-Superior's Criminal Justice Program distinguish themselves in many diverse professional fields, in graduate and law schools, and in the community. Alumni serve in positions of responsibility across the nation in federal, state and local criminal and juvenile justice agencies. Others have careers as private attorneys, paralegals, youth counselors, military officers, security/loss specialists and private investigators.

Students are free to take any of the 26 elective courses as long as they have completed required prerequisites. Nevertheless, to assist in the selection, four course groupings are suggested or consideration. Each grouping is a possible track to a career. Review of course choices should be made in consultation with the student's advisor.5
 

Track I: Law Enforcement

These 17 elective courses are suggested for students with career interests in public or private policing or other law enforcement agencies:

CJUS 210 Criminal Procedure and Evidence
CJUS 212 Managing Criminal Investigations
CJUS 300 Police Administration
CJUS 317 Interpersonal, Community and Global Violence
CJUS 350 An Introduction to Addiction and Recovery
CJUS 451 Constitutional Law, Part II
POLS 150 American National Government
POLS 370 Public Policy Analysis
POLS 467 Public Administration
POLS 468 Policy Evaluation
PSYC 310 Social Psychology
SOW 227 Interpersonal Skills
SOW 329 Crisis Intervention
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I
SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II
 

Track II: Law and Court Processing

These 16 courses are suggested for students with career interests in criminal law or in court administration:

CJUS 210 Criminal Procedure and Evidence
CJUS 321 Judicial Process and Politics
CJUS 368 Alternative Dispute Resolution
CJUS 431 International Law: Human Rights and War Crimes
CJUS 451 Constitutional Law, Part II
POLS 150 American National Government
POLS 354 Introduction to Jurisprudence
POLS 370 Public Policy Analysis
POLS 467 Public Administration
POLS 468 Policy Evaluation
PSYC 310 Social Psychology
SOW 227 Interpersonal Skills
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I
SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II
 

Track III: Corrections

These 15 elective courses are suggested for students with career interests in community or institutional corrections either in the public or private sector:

CJUS 317 Interpersonal, Community and Global Violence
CJUS 318 Community Corrections
CJUS 350 An Introduction to Addiction and Recovery
CJUS 451 Constitutional Law, Part II
POLS 150 American National Government
POLS 370 Public Policy Analysis
POLS 467 Public Administration
POLS 468 Policy Evaluation
PSYC 310 Social Psychology
SOW 227 Interpersonal Skills
SOW 329 Crisis Intervention
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I
SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II
 

Track IV: Graduate Education

These 19 elective courses are suggested for students with varied career interests who would benefit from attending a graduate program in criminal justice or an allied field:

CJUS 300 Police Administration
CJUS 317 Interpersonal, Community and Global Violence
CJUS 318 Community Corrections
CJUS 321 Judicial Process and Politics
CJUS 350 An Introduction to Addiction and Recovery
CJUS 368 Alternative Dispute Resolution
CJUS 431 International Law: Human Rights and War Crimes
CJUS 451 Constitutional Law, Part II
POLS 150 American National Government
POLS 354 Introduction to Jurisprudence
POLS 370 Public Policy Analysis
POLS 467 Public Administration
POLS 468 Policy Evaluation
PSYC 310 Social Psychology
SOW 329 Crisis Intervention
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I
SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

Three more possible choices. Depending on its content, the following courses also may be quite relevant to any particular career path. Please check with the instructor:

CJUS 160 Field Experience in Criminal Justice
CJUS 320 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
CJUS 497 Special and Student-Initiated Seminar
CJUS 499 Individualized Research or Applied Skills
 

Notes:

1Consent of the instructor must be obtained before registering for the CJUS 491 Criminal Justice Internship since the course is an independent learning experience involving an outside agency. The student should consult with the coordinator about a prospective internship early in the semester before the semester of the actual field experience (see course description for details). Under some circumstances, students may elect to enroll in both CJUS 491 Criminal Justice Internship and CJUS 499 Individualized Research or Applied Skills in the same semester. Students may then spend the semester off campus engaged in research and professional development in a justice setting. Their credit hour load that semester may equal 16 credit hours.

2Elective coursework should be appropriate for student career aspirations and educational interests and should be selected in consultation with an appropriate advisor.

3 Permission of Criminal Justice Program coordinator required.

4MATH 130 Elementary Statistics Prerequisite: Acceptable score on the Mathematics Placement Test or completion of MATH 095 with a grade of at least C-.

5Students should consult with their advisors concerning graduate, professional and employment opportunities in criminal justice and related fields.
 

Criminal Justice Minor

The curriculum consists of coursework in three areas. Students take 11 courses from these three areas: (1) five required courses in criminal justice; (2) three required courses from other related fields; and (3) three elective criminal justice courses from a list of 17.

A minimum of 33 credits of which three credits satisfy General Education requirements. Nine credits (three required courses) are from the disciplines of Political Science, Psychology and Sociology. The other 24 credits (eight courses) are from Criminal Justice.

Criminal Justice Required Courses

CJUS 106 Human Behavior and Its Control ? Satisfies general education requirement for human behavior category.
CJUS 207 Police in American Communities
CJUS 211 Criminal Law
CJUS 315 Courts and American Justice
CJUS 316 Crime, Corrections and Punishment

Required Courses from Other Disciplines

POLS 330 U.S. State and Local Government
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology
SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology

Elective Courses

An additional nine credits (three courses) taken from among the following 18 courses, one of which must be numbered 300 or higher.

CJUS 160 Field Experience in Criminal Justice
CJUS 210 Criminal Procedure and Evidence
CJUS 212 Managing Criminal Investigations
CJUS 300 Police Administration
CJUS 308 Criminology
CJUS 312 Gender, Crime and Justice
CJUS 317 Interpersonal, Community and Global Violence
CJUS 318 Community Corrections
CJUS 320 Special Topics in Criminal Justice
CJUS 321 Judicial Process and Politics
CJUS 350 An Introduction to Addiction and Recovery
CJUS 368 Alternative Dispute Resolution
CJUS 431 International Law: Human Rights and War Crimes
CJUS 451 Constitutional Law, Part II
CJUS 463 The Juvenile Justice System
CJUS 491 Criminal Justice Internship
CJUS 497 Special and Student-Initiated Seminar
CJUS 499 Individualized Research or Applied Skills