Mathematics Major (Liberal Arts)
Discrete Applied Mathematics Major
(Comprehensive)
Mathematics Major (Secondary Education)
Computer Science Major (Comprehensive)
Computer Science Major
(Liberal Arts)
Engineering
Mathematics Minor (Liberal Arts)
Mathematics Minor
(Secondary Education)

Mathematics Minor (Elementary Education)
Computer Science Minor (Liberal Arts)
Computer Science (Secondary Education)

Mathematics and Computer Science

Faculty and Academic Staff
David F. Beran, Professor
Sergei Bezrukov, Associate Professor
Victor Piotrowski, Associate Professor
Steven J. Rosenberg, Assistant Professor
Chad H. Scott, Associate Professor
Marilyn Toscano, Senior Lecturer

Contributing Academic Staff
Dorothy Anway, Senior Lecturer
Hossain Khoroosi, Senior Lecturer
Daniel Rau, Senior Lecturer

Courses are offered in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Mathematics Education. The curriculum provides fundamental courses as well as a variety of electives for those with special interests. Students may choose a major that prepares them for a career and/or graduate study in Computer Science, Mathematics or Mathematics Education. Those interested in Engineering can choose the Engineering Dual Degree program (in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s College of Engineering or Michigan Technological University). Students also can pursue a career in Actuarial Science or Computer Security with appropriate choices of elective courses. More details on programs offered by the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science are presented below and at http://math.uwsuper.edu.

Mathematics major programs include Liberal Arts, Discrete Applied Mathematics (comprehensive, no minor required), and Secondary Education. Mathematics minor programs include Liberal Arts, Secondary Education and Elementary Education.

A Computer Science degree can be obtained with a comprehensive major or a Liberal Arts major that requires an additional minor or major. Computer Science minor programs include Liberal Arts and Secondary Education.

All major programs permit choices of courses appropriate to individual interests, which should be made in consultation with a Mathematics and Computer Science faculty advisor.

Mathematics

Mathematics Major
(Liberal Arts)

(requires an additional minor or a second major)
Mathematics Major Liberal Arts prepares students for careers in mathematics, science and research, or for graduate study.

A minimum of 36 credits, including:
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 242      Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
MATH 310      Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
MATH 315      Linear Algebra
MATH 399      Mathematical Sciences Seminar

At least one of:
MATH 370      Probability
MATH 371      Statistics
MATH 380      Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

At least two of :
MATH 421      Theory of Computation
MATH 437      Cryptography
MATH 440      Real Analysis
MATH 455      Abstract Algebra
MATH 471      Introduction to Complex Variables

And at least one additional MATH course numbered 300 or above.
Discrete Applied Mathematics Major
(Comprehensive)

The Discrete Applied Mathematics major provides the tools used in many everyday activities in science and industry. Many objects and notions in the modern world are discrete in their nature and require special methods for their study. Research directions that are based mostly on the discrete approach include: coding theory and cryptography, data protection and compression, network analysis, parallel computing, logic, theory of computation, discrete and combinatorial optimization, scheduling theory, programming language design, and many others. Continuous methods of classical mathematics are, as a rule, largely inapplicable to these areas. Many of these fields are actually at the border between mathematics and theoretical computer science. This major offers a number of exciting courses that are intended for those who are interested in computers and mathematics. Computer science is not limited to programming. It uses discrete mathematics methods extensively to find more efficient solutions. Discrete mathematics has grown from everyday practical problems, and knowing efficient approaches to solving them has been found to be very beneficial.

A minimum of 54 credits, including:
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 242      Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
MATH 310      Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
MATH 315      Linear Algebra
MATH 320      Discrete Structures
MATH 370      Probability
MATH 399      Mathematical Sciences Seminar
MATH 455      Abstract Algebra
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming
CSCI 202        Object-Oriented Programming
CSCI 303        Algorithms and Data Structures
CSCI 421        Theory of Computation
CSCI 425        Algorithm Design and Analysis

And at least two additional courses in MATH or CSCI numbered 300 or above.

Preparation for Graduate Study
Students who intend to do graduate work in mathematics should include both MATH 440 and 455 in their course selections when completing one of the major programs above. Many graduate schools require the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Advanced Mathematics Test. Approximately 50 percent of the GRE Advanced Mathematics Test covers topics in analysis through advanced calculus. Twenty-five percent covers linear algebra and abstract algebra, and the remaining 25 percent covers such topics as number theory, probability, statistics, topology, complex variables, numerical analysis and computer programming.

Actuarial Science
Students of Mathematics can find a rewarding career as an actuary in finance, insurance or any of a wide variety of industries requiring risk analysis and assessment. These courses are recommended: MATH 240, 241, 242, 301, 370, 371; ECON 250, 251; FIN 320, 420, 426; ACCT 200. In general, students should take a broad spectrum of courses in Accounting, Economics, Political Science, Finance and Business Administration as well as Mathematics and Computer Science. Interested students should contact Dr. Steven Rosenberg in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.
 

Mathematics Major
(Secondary Education)

The Mathematics Major Secondary Education prepares students to teach Mathematics in grades 6-12.

A minimum of 35 credits, including:
CSCI 170        Programming and Technology for the Teaching of Mathematics
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 242      Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
MATH 310      Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
MATH 315      Linear Algebra
MATH 362      Topics in Geometry

At least one of:
MATH 320      Discrete Structures
MATH 344      Differential Equations

At least one of:
MATH 370      Probability
MATH 371      Statistics
MATH 380      Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

At least one of:
MATH 421      Theory of Computation
MATH 437      Cryptography
MATH 440      Real Analysis
MATH 455      Abstract Algebra
MATH 471      Introduction to Complex Variables

Required for teacher certification:
MATH 339      Teaching Mathematics/Computer Science in the Secondary School
TED 305          Tutor Practicum

For additional requirements, see "Professional Requirements for Secondary Education Certification" in the Teacher Education section of the catalog.

Computer Science

Computer Science Major
(Comprehensive)

The Computer Science Major provides the comprehensive background necessary to prepare students for positions in industry or to pursue graduate study. Students completing this major will have a sufficient understanding of the basic principles and concepts in computer science but also will be able to meet immediate demands for solving real-world computational problems. This program is an ideal choice for students who intend to work as computer science professionals.

A minimum of 57 credits, including:
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 310      Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming
CSCI 202        Object-Oriented Programming
CSCI 303        Algorithms and Data Structures
CSCI 320        Discrete Structures
CSCI 324        Assembly Language Programming
CSCI 340        Software Development and Professional Practice
CSCI 451        Operating Systems and System Security
CSCI 461        Computer Architecture and Organization
CSCI 470        Net-centric Computing and Network Security
CSCI 499        Capstone Project

At least one of:
CSCI 421        Theory of Computation
CSCI 425        Algorithm Analysis and Design
CSCI 437        Cryptography

At least one of:
CIS 347           Database Systems
CSCI 356        Information Management and Security

Additional courses may be chosen from CSCI courses numbered 200 or above or CIS 355, CIS 360.
 

Computer Science Major
(Liberal Arts)

(requires an additional minor or a second major)
The Computer Science Major Liberal Arts provides the fundamental education necessary to prepare students for positions in industry, to pursue graduate study or to assume responsibilities in an area that requires knowledge of basic principles and concepts in computer science.

A minimum of 36 credits, including:
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming
CSCI 202        Object-Oriented Programming
CSCI 303        Algorithms and Data Structures
CSCI 320        Discrete Structure
CSCI 324        Assembly Language Programming
CSCI 399        Mathematical Sciences Seminar

At least one of:
CSCI 451        Operating Systems and System Security
CSCI 461        Computer Architecture and Organization
CSCI 470        Net-centric Computing and Network Security

At least one of:
CSCI 421        Theory of Computation
CSCI 425        Algorithm Analysis and Design
CSCI 437        Cryptography

Additional courses may be chosen from CSCI courses numbered 200 or above.

Computer Security
The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science is a member of a consortium led by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee which, when approved by the National Security Agency, will train elite computer security experts, America’s "Cyber Corps," to form a line of defense against cyber crime. Students in their junior year will be eligible for Scholarship for Service grants from the National Science Foundation. After one year of training, students will complete a summer internship with a federal agency. Successful participants in this program will earn a computer security certificate while fulfilling the requirements for a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. For more information and current status of the project, contact Dr. Victor Piotrowski in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.

Internship and Professional Practice
Students who major in programs offered by the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science have opportunities for paid work related to their field of study. Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval by the Mathematics and Computer Science faculty. After completing our course on Software Development and Professional Practice, advanced computer science students will have the opportunity to participate in a capstone experience integrating their previous coursework into a real-world software project. Currently, this experience includes a partnership venture with the University of Minnesota, Duluth, and local businesses to develop cutting-edge applications, with the exciting prospect of taking advantage of emerging technologies to be first to market with a product for which there is a real business need and great future potential.

Engineering

Dual Degree
Michigan Technological University in Houghton, Mich., and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have Engineering Dual Degree agreements with UW-Superior's Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. These five-year programs include three years of study in Mathematics at UW-Superior and two years of study in Engineering at one of the above universities. Upon successful completion, the student receives a Bachelor of Science degree from UW-Superior and an Engineering degree from Michigan Tech or UW-Madison.

Pre-Engineering
Students may transfer to one of several engineering schools after completing two or three years of study at UW-Superior. Appropriate core courses for engineering in mathematics and the sciences plus general courses in humanities, social studies, and English are included. The selection of courses is based on the requirements of the school to which the student plans to transfer.

Minors

Mathematics Minor
(Liberal Arts)

A minimum of 21 credits, including:
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 310      Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

And one of:
CSCI 170        Programming and Technology for the Teaching of Mathematics
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming

Remaining credits must be earned in MATH 242 or in Mathematics courses numbered 300 or above.
 

Mathematics Minor
(Secondary Education)

A minimum of 24 credits, including:
CSCI 170        Programming and Technology for the Teaching of Mathematics
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 242      Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
MATH 310      Intro to Abstract Mathematics
MATH 362      Topics in Geometry

At least one of:
MATH 315      Linear Algebra
MATH 370      Probability
MATH 371      Statistics
MATH 380      Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

Required for teacher certification:
MATH 339      Teaching Mathematics/Computer Science in the Secondary School
TED 305          Tutor Practicum
 

Mathematics Minor
(Elementary Education)

(1-8 Track)
A minimum of 22 credits, including:
CSCI 170        Programming and Technology for the Teaching of Mathematics
MATH 230      Foundations of Mathematics I
MATH 231      Foundations of Mathematics II
MATH 240      Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MATH 310      Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
MATH 362      Topics in Geometry

At least one of:
MATH 241      Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
MATH 315      Linear Algebra
 

Computer Science Minor
(Liberal Arts
)
A minimum of 22 credits in CSCI courses numbered 200 or above, including:
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming
CSCI 202        Object-Oriented Programming
CSCI 303        Algorithms and Data Structures
CSCI 324        Assembly Language Programming
 

Computer Science
(Secondary Education)

A minimum of 22 credits in CSCI courses including:
CSCI 170        Programming and Technology for the Teaching of Mathematics
CSCI 201        Introduction to Programming
CSCI 202        Object-Oriented Programming
CSCI 303        Algorithms and Data Structures
CSCI 324        Assembly Language Programming

And at least two additional CSCI courses numbered 110 or above

Required for teacher certification:
MATH 339      Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science in the Secondary Classroom
TED 305          Tutor Practicum

See Course Descriptions for information on required courses.